CD Review: The Apples In Stereo, "Travellers In Space and Time" | Popdose

applesinstereo

My review of the new Apples In Stereo album, Travellers In Space and Time, has been posted to Popdose:

The new Apples In Stereo album, Travellers (sic) In Space and Time, finds the band traveling back to the ’70s and ’80s to dutifully recreate the sound of pop music at the time. Frontman Robert Schneider calls it “retro-futuristic super-pop.” Retro it certainly is, futuristic I certainly hope it is not, and super is quite a stretch. Let’s just say that I don’t get it. If you want to screw around in your studio, more power to you, but don’t ask people to pay for the privilege of hearing your musings. I am not generally given to writing negative reviews of indie-bands, but this just made me mad.”

To read the entire review, please click here.
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Soul Serenade: Gene Chandler, "Just Be True" | Popdose

genechandler

My latest Soul Serenade column for Popdose features Gene Chandler with his 1964 hit “Just Be True.”

“Last week I wrote about the Magnificent Men, and their hit “Peace of Mind.” One of the songs that the band included on their 1967 album “The Magnificent Men Live” was a cover of Gene Chandler’s 1964 hit “Just Be True.” It was one of those times when a great cover version of a song inspired me to seek out the original.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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CD Review: The Rolling Stones, "Exile On Main Street" (Original Recording Remastered) | Popdose

exile

My review of the remastered Deluxe Edition of the Rolling Stones Exile On Main Street has been posted to Popdose:


“A case could be made that Exile On Main Street (Universal) is the greatest rock and roll album ever made. After all, it’s got everything, from the full-tilt boogie of “Rip This Joint,” to the otherworldly blues of Slim Harpo’s “Shake Your Hips,” and the terrifying voodoo of the savage “Ventilator Blues.” There is the very noticeable influence of Gram Parsons (very much a part of the Stones camp in those days) on “Sweet Virginia,” and especially “Torn and Frayed.” Then there is “Tumbling Dice” which is arguably the greatest single ever made. If you can listen to the song without throwing your arms into the air and singing along ecstatically, check your pulse. The album’s only other single was the equally joyous “Happy,” which features a lead vocal from Keith Richards. A great Charlie Watts performance puts “Loving Cup” on the map, and I haven’t even mentioned the classic pure Stones tracks “All Down the Line,” “Stop Breaking Down,” and “Shine A Light.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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